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What to Do When You Can’t Find a Job after a Layoff

If you were laid off from your job, you should actively be searching for a new one. Unfortunately, the search may not go as you had hoped. Millions of Americans are unemployed. All of those people are looking for jobs. The competition is fierce and the number of available jobs is limited. What should you do if you keep hitting roadblocks? What should you do if you haven’t found a job after actively searching for months?


Don’t get stressed and do not panic. Job layoffs are scary. An income is lost. Many Americans qualify for unemployment benefits and some receive good severance packages, but they do not last forever. After searching four months for a job, panic is likely to set in. You may wonder how you will pay the mortgage or how you will put food on the table. Panic will not do any good. In fact, it just makes the situation worse. If you haven’t already, work on reducing expenses at home. Shut off your cable or satellite television, even just temporarily. Save money any way that you can.


Don’t give up. If you have been actively searching for a job for four months, you could have easily attended 100 job interviews. However, you are still unemployed. Talk about depressing. Nothing feels worse than having 100 people basically say you are not good enough for the job. You may want to stop looking altogether, but don’t. Keep your head held high. Layoffs influence many. You may have had 20 years experience working as an auto mechanic, but they may have hired someone with 30 years. It does not mean you aren’t good enough for the job, someone just had more experience.


Slightly lower your standards. If you worked as a retail district manager, you held a high position. You were in charge of store managers, who were in charge of their employees. The poor economy has impacted retail stores all across the country. Companies are downsizing and closing many stores. Now is not the best time to find a well-paying job as a district manager. For that reason, consider slightly lowering your standards. Apply for store manager or assistant manager jobs. You are more than qualified. Yes, the pay is less, but at least it is a job.


Look for part-time work. After a job layoff, many Americans want to get back to work. Unfortunately, everyone wants the same type of job with the same type of pay. This is full-time work, as it provides better pay and benefits. Full-time positions have the most competition. Keep applying for these jobs, but consider using a part-time job to fill the void. If unemployment was denied or if those benefits are running out, you may not have a choice. Luckily, part-time jobs don’t have to last forever.


Do odd jobs around your community. Before getting laid off, did you work as a construction worker, landscaper, or in another similar field? If so, you provide a service. These services are always in demand. You may have experience building schools, but why not help an older woman in your community rebuild her garage? You may have been a landscape designer, but why not mow lawns for extra cash? Odd jobs are not steady, but they will bring you much needed money.


Consider starting your own business. With the poor economy, you may think now is not the best time to start a business. It depends. Some communities have skyrocketing unemployment rates, while others only saw a slight increase. If your community was one, you could easily start a business and see profits. The key is to choose your location wisely, as well as your business. Do not start a dollar store if your small community already has one. Do not start a lawn mowing business unless you intend to charge fair and reasonable prices. As previously stated, odd jobs are a great way to put food on the table. They are a great way to test the waters for starting a new business.

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